A Gardening Carnival-November 26, 2008

Welcome to the November 26, 2008 edition of a gardening carnival.

Condo Blues presents Three Easy, Natural, and Free Fall Centerpieces posted at Condo Blues.

Madeleine Begun Kane presents Yard Yarns (Limerick and Haiku Prompt) posted at Mad Kane’s Humor Blog.

flowers

GrrlScientist presents Lotus Blossom posted at Living the Scientific Life, saying, “Lotus blossom. Photographed at Attwater, Texas.”

Laurie Bluedorn presents Trivium Pursuit » Blog Archive » Flowers posted at Laurie Bluedorn, saying, “Here is a tour of our garden as it was in August.”

gardening

Sarah presents Guide to Buying Sprinklers | Winter Lawn Care – Lawn Care Tips posted at Lawn Care Tips, saying, “A guide to buying the right sprinklers for your lawn.”

Machione presents GREEN ACRES Is The Place To Be… posted at Fear And Loathing – The Gonzo Papers, saying, “This summer a vegetable garden popped up in The Writer’s Refuge.”

Kilroy_60 presents I Took Time For Myself… posted at The Lives and Times… of Anthony McCune, saying, “Yesterday I made a point of taking time for myself. I shot photos of the lamb’s ear my mate planted in the garden.”

Hortois presents What Ornamental Grasses to Grow posted at The Compost Heap, saying, “Top grasses and bamboos”

Rachel Kayne presents An RKayne Garden: Northwest Garden Show posted at An RKayne Garden, saying, “organics, water gardening, indoors and out, container, I do it all (oh, and bonsai!).”

Wilfrid presents Time Saving Gardening Techniques posted at Gardening Tips For Beginners, saying, “A few techniques that can go a long way when it comes to making your gardening more efficient”

house plants

Hortoris presents Conservatory Plants posted at The Compost Heap, saying, “Indoor plants see also http://gardenerstips.co.uk/blog/flowers/hibiscus-senensis/”

Dereck presents Gardening in the Winter posted at I Will Not Die.

landscape

GrrlScientist presents Manhattan in Autumn at the Anne Loftus Playground posted at Living the Scientific Life, saying, “The Anne Loftus playground, which is located in the northeast corner of Fort Tryon Park in Inwood (Manhattan), was named in honor of Anne Loftus (1925-1989), who was a businesswoman and a neighborhood administrator. The park itself, which covers 67 acres, was named for Sir William Tryon, who was a Major General and the last British governor of colonial New York.”

Lauren Rose presents Choosing the Best Plants for your Garden posted at Own Home Style .com, saying, “How to choose the best plants for your garden”

organic gardening

Karen Shanley presents Author Mom with Dogs » Blog Archive » Zucchinis or Squashes Setting Small Fruit? Absence of Bees May Require Hand Pollinating posted at Karen Shanley.

vegetables

Woman Tribune presents Top 10 Produce You Should Buy Organic posted at Woman Tribune.

Kathy Hester (GeekyPoet) presents Grow Your Own Lettuce posted at Walk a Greener Path.

That concludes this edition. Submit your blog article to the next edition of a gardening carnival using our carnival submission form. The next edition will be posted on December 24, 2008.

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A Gardening Carnival – October 29, 2008

Welcome to the October 29, 2008 edition of a gardening carnival.

Sharontpc presents Who Knew? My Clematis turned into Morning Glories. posted at Psychic Cottage, saying, “Not sure if you do funny gardening stuff.”

Lauren Rose presents THE CULTIVATION OF VEGETABLES | Own Home Style .com posted at Own Home Style .com, saying, “Nowadays due to the introduction of new hybrid varieties in vegetables, which are susceptible to pest and diseases, there is demand for more plant protection, usually with toxic chemicals.”

GrrlScientist presents Honeycomb posted at Living the Scientific Life, saying, “A picture of a honeybee honeycomb, photographed at Russ Pittman Park, Texas.”

flowers

GrrlScientist presents Seattle Visit: University of Washington’s GreenHouse, Part One posted at Living the Scientific Life, saying, “Part one of my two-part photoessay about my visit to the biology department’s greenhouse on Seattle’s University of Washington campus. lots of gorgeous images!”

Condo Blues presents Condo Blues: Drying Fresh Lavender posted at Condo Blues.

gardening

Kristen McCarthy presents Community Gardens: Transform Urban Spaces posted at this-sustainable-life.com, saying, “Traditionally, community gardens emerge in the most unlikely spaces: from dispossessed parking lots and abandoned railway lines, to hubcap strewn parks and needle plagued back alleys, to the sagging rooftops that overlook laundry lines stretched out across the cityscape in multifarious patterns. In these areas rejected and wasted from human-made decay, urban gardens are birthed.”

Sarah presents Ridding Your Lawn of Gophers, Moles and Other Rodents | Spring Lawn Care – Lawn Care Tips posted at Lawn Care Tips, saying, “How to get rid of pesky lawn creatures.”

Bobbie Whitehead presents Garlic Onion Time posted at Bobbie Whitehead.

nichole halsey presents Growing Garlic at Home – Planting it? posted at Bad Human! Don’t take chemicals from strangers!, saying, “Easy fall planting”

house plants

Annette Berlin presents How To Grow Hydroponic Herbs posted at Craft Stew, saying, “I’m not much of a gardener. I’m too afraid of snakes and spiders to enjoy playing in the mud. The one exception to my purple thumb is hydroponic herbs. Growing hydroponic herbs is so easy, even I can do it. It’s a no-brainer.”

Sarah presents Why Is Proper Lawn Clipping Height So Important? | Spring Lawn Care – Lawn Care Tips posted at Lawn Care Tips, saying, “Some reasons why it’s really important to clip your lawn correctly.”

John Rhodes presents Lawn Care Success or Failure, ProGardenBiz Magazine V1 Issue 3 posted at Lawn Care, saying, “Some things that will determine whether your lawn business is successful or not”

landscape

Giorgina Devereaux presents Outdoor Decorating Ideas posted at Home Decor Blog.

organic gardening

Jamie McIntosh presents Save Money with Organic Gardening posted at Jamie’s Blog, saying, “Everyone knows that green living techniques can save money by saving energy in the household. Earth-friendly organic gardens can also help you save money.”

GrrlScientist presents Seattle Visit: The Montlake Fill (UBNA) posted at Living the Scientific Life, saying, “This photoessay describes my visit to one of the finest small- to medium-sized urban birding areas on the west coast of North America, the Montlake Fill. This is a reclaimed wetland that was formerly a city dump.”

vegetables

Bobbie Whitehead presents Cole Crops Ready posted at Bobbie Whitehead.

KimberlyKA presents Vegatable Garden Planting Guide posted at Food Talk 101.

That concludes this edition. Submit your blog article to the next edition of a gardening carnival using our carnival submission form. The next edition will be posted on November 26, 2008.

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A Gardening Carnival – September 26, 2008

carnival-ride.JPG Welcome to the September 26, 2008 edition of a gardening carnival.

flowers

GrrlScientist presents Visiting Darwin’s Home, Part 2: The Gardens posted at Living the Scientific Life, saying, “[photoessay] After touring Darwin’s Down House near London, England, I next toured the Gardens and photographed some of Darwin’s experiments. Includes information and lots of photographs.”

gardening

Melinda presents VIDEO!! Gardening 101: How To Hand-Pollinate Tomatoes & Peppers posted at One Green Generation.

Deanna Caswell presents Add PVC Hoops To Raised Beds posted at Little House in the Suburbs.

Piedro Molinero presents More About Butterfly Gardening posted at DIY Gardening Tips.

Deanna Caswell presents Build a Garden Cubby posted at Little House in the Suburbs, saying, “Thank you!”

P.L. Frederick presents Why I Hate Flies posted at Small and Big, saying, “Not sure if this is appropriate for your carnival but just in case. It’s a short, fun read!”

landscape

Jendi presents Problem Solved posted at Garden Vines.

organic gardening

Jamie McIntosh presents Sawdust in the Organic Garden posted at Jamie’s Blog, saying, “Put wood shavings to work in your compost bin or garden storage area.”

Marilyn Zink presents Benefits of Organic Herbs vs. Non-Organic Herbs posted at Herbal Collective, saying, “How organic herbs help improve skin care, bedding, cosmetics and shampoo, particularly for children.”

roses

Piedro Molinero presents Rose Gardening posted at DIY Gardening Tips.

vegetables

AdmirableIndia.com presents Pearl Valley or Muthyala Maduvu, Karnataka posted at AdmirableIndia.com, saying, “Cauliflower”

Chris Hinkelman presents What do you do with the mid-season glut? posted at Borage for Courage, saying, “One of my absolutely favorite recipes for using your fresh garden ingredients.”

That concludes this edition. Submit your blog article to the next edition of a gardening carnival using our carnival submission form. The next edition will be posted on October 29, 2008.

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PODCAST: How to Plant a New Lawn From Seed

podcast.jpgIn this week’s podcast, we are focusing on how to plant a new lawn from seed. By following the steps I give to you, you will be sure to have that lush, green, healthy lawn you have been dreaming about.

A healthy and great start to your new lawn will be extremely beneficial and help you to have the lawn you desire. You can choose seed that is drought tolerant and you can manage the watering so that a deep root system is established. By doing these things in the beginning, you will train the lawn to stay green with even less water. And that will give you the best of both worlds…water conservation and a lush, green lawn to play on.

If you have a question for us here at Her Gardening Blog, please leave a comment below the podcast. We will be happy to answer your questions and build an entire weekly podcast around them. Enjoy!

how-to-plant-a-new-lawn-from-seed.mp3

Vines and Groundcovers

vines.jpgVines are typically used to grow up and along fences, walls and the sides of buildings. There are two types of vines: twining and clinging. The twining vines need something to twine around such as a trellis or a chain link fence. Clinging vines generally have suction cups that suction themselves to a wall or a fence.

Here are some of the vines and groundcovers that will grow in at least zones 3 – 5. I have included the minimum zone that these will grow in parentheses.

Vines

  • Dutchman’s Pipe—Vigorous, twining vine. Large, heart-shaped green leaves. Grows flat against a trellis. Offers dense shade. The flowers are brown and small and are usually hidden by the leaves, and resemble a Meerschaum pipe. It grows in sun or shade, and grows to about 30’ long. (Zone 4)

  • Honeysuckle, Dropmore Scarlet—Tall growing, twining vine. Bright orange=scarlet tubular flowers from June to September. Grows in full sun. Fast growing to 10 – 20’ long, 10’ wide. (Zone 3)

  • Honeysuckle, Goldflame—Woody, twining vine valued for fragrant, rosy-red and yellow flowers from June until Frost. Fast growing to 10 – 20’ long. Needs full sun. (Zone 5)

  • Honeysuckle, Hall’s—An extremely vigorous twining vine. The extremely fragrant white flowers fade to yellow. Needs full sun. Fast growing to 15 – 20’ long. (Zone 5)

  • Honeysuckle, Mandarin—Twining vine with orange-red flowers that attract hummingbirds. Masses of flowers bloom from May through July. Needs full sun. Fast growing to 15 – 20’ long. (Zone 3)

  • Hops, Nugget Ornamental—A vigorous climbing vine that will quickly wraps itself around any upright structure in a season. Produces papery cone-like hops later in the summer, typically used to produce beer. Will die back to the ground each winter, but grows back quickly each season. Grows 15 – 20’ tall. (Zone 3)

  • Ivy, BostonDense, self-clinging vine. Attractive green foliage and exceptional orange-red fall color. Blue-black berries. Excellent for covering masonry, fences. Full to partial sun. Fast grower to 30 – 45’ long. (Zone 4)

  • Ivy, Engelmann—Vigorous, climbing vine. Fall color is a deep, burgundy-red. Small blue fruits are attractive to birds. Rapid growing to 20 – 30’. (Zone 3)

  • Rose, Henry Kelsey—Beautiful climbing rose with medium red, double flowers with a yellow center. Rich, spicy fragrance. Small orange hips in the fall. Dark glossy green foliage tinted with burgundy. Needs full sun. Grows 6 – 7’ tall. (Zone 3)

  • Rose, John Davis—Climbing rose with medium pink, double flowers. Spicy fragrance. Needs full sun. Grows 6 – 8’ tall. (Zone 3)

  • Rose, William Baffin—Climbing rose with strawberry pink blooms all summer. Small red-orange rose hips in the fall. Needs full sun. Grows 8 – 10’ tall. (Zone 3)

  • Trumpetvine—Shrubby, coarse foliage on a vigorous, twining vine. Will climb in stone or woodwork. Showy, orange and scarlet flowers blossom in mid-summer. Grows to 20 – 30’ long. (Zone 5)

  • Virginia Creeper/Woodbine—Rapid growing, twining vine. Deep burgundy-red fall foliage. Small blue fruits attractive to birds. Full sun or shade. Fast growing to 30’ long. (Zone 3)

Groundcovers

  • Juniper, Blue Rug—Low growing, evergreen groundcover. Forms a dense mat of blue foliage. Good as a groundcover or along banks. Attractive when used to drape over a retaining wall. Full sun to light shade. Grows 4 – 6” high, 3 – 5’ wide. (Zone 3)

  • Juniper, Calgary Carpet—Low growing, evergreen groundcover. Soft green foliage. Use along walkways or as a groundcover. Needs full sun. Grows 6 – 9” tall, 10’ wide. (Zone 3)

  • Juniper, Japanese GardenEvergreen groundcover. Beautiful bluish-green foliage. Nice accent in a rock garden. Needs full sun. Grows 6 – 10” tall, 3 – 5’ wide. (Zone 4)

  • Kinnickinnick—Excellent evergreen groundcover with waxy green foliage and scarlet red fruit. Thrives in sandy soil and hot sun. Pinkish-white flowers in spring. Fruits in August and September. Full to partial sun. Spreads 10 – 15’ wide. (Zone 2)

  • Mahonia, Creeping—Low growing, evergreen groundcover. Dull blue-green leaves in summer turn a bronzy purple for the winter months. Blooms in early spring with yellow flowers. Blue-black berries in August and September. Full sun to part shade. Grows 12 -15” tall, 3 – 4’ wide. (Zone 5)

  • Wintercreeper, Purpleleaf—Outstanding evergreen groundcover. Deep green foliage turns a beautiful, rich plum color during the cool season. Will climb nearby structures or walls. Full to partial sun. Moderate grower to 6 – 8’ wide. (Zone 4)

Now that you have some ideas for some great vines and groundcovers, which ones will you use in your yard? What other vines and groundcovers will you use? How will you use them? Leave me a comment about your vines and groundcovers.

Photo by Kevin Rosseel

Attracting Butterflies and Hummingbirds to the Garden

butterfly.JPGMost people welcome butterflies and hummingbirds into their gardens. If you choose the right plants, you can even encourage them to stay for awhile. Butterflies will find a sunny area such as a meadow that is sheltered from the wind to be the most welcoming. They will especially love such amenities as leaf litter, rock crevices, damp places, brush piles and even weeds.

When you choose plants for your garden, keep in mind that not every plant will attracthummingbird.jpg butterflies in every region. You should also be very careful to not use pesticides unless you are able to target the specific pest without harming the butterflies.

Hummingbirds ingest half of their food every day. Flowering plants provide nectar; spiders and insects supply protein. Hummingbirds will visit a wide variety of plants. The following plants and flowers are some of their favorites.

Flowers

Botanical Name (Common Name)

  • Achilla(Yarrow)
  • Alcea–(Hollyhock)
  • Allium–(Chives)
  • Anaphalis–(Pearly Everlasting)
  • Antirrhinum–(Snapdragon)
  • Aquilegia–(Columbine)
  • Arabis–(Rock Cress)
  • Armeria–(Thrift)
  • Asclepias–(Butterfly Weed)
  • Aster–(Aster)
  • Astilbe–(False Spirea)
  • Borago–(Borage)
  • Calamintha(Calamint)
  • Catananche(Cupid’s Dart)
  • Centaurea–(Cornflower)
  • Centranthus ruber(Jupiter’s Beard)
  • Crysanthemum–(Shasta Daisy)
  • Coreopsis–(Coreopsis)
  • Cosmos–(Cosmos)
  • Delphinium–(Delphinium)
  • Dianthus–(Pink)
  • Digitalis–(Foxglove)
  • Echinacea–(Purple Coneflower)
  • Echinops–(Globe Thistle)
  • Erigeron–(Fleabane)
  • Eupatorium–(Joe-Pye Weed)
  • Fuchsia–(Fuchsia)
  • Gaillardia–(Blanket Flower)
  • Heliotropium–(Heliotrope)
  • Heuchera–(Coral Bells)
  • Iberis(Candytuft)
  • Iris–(Siberian Iris)
  • Knifophia–(Red Hot Poker)
  • Lantana–(Lantana)
  • Lavendula–(Lavender)
  • Liatris–(Gayfeather)
  • Lobelia–(Cardinal Flower)
  • Lobularia(Sweet Alyssum)
  • Lupinus–(Lupine)
  • Mimulas–(Monkey Flower)
  • Monarda–(Bee Balm)
  • Nasturtium–(Nasturtium)
  • Nepata–(Catmint)
  • Origanum–(Oregano)
  • Penstemon–(Beard Tongue)
  • Petunia–(Petunia)
  • Phlox–(Phlox)
  • Physostegia–(Obedient Plant)
  • Rudbeckia–(Gloriosa Daisy)
  • Salvia–(Sage)
  • Scabiosa–(Pincushion Flower)
  • Sedum–(Stonecrop)
  • Tagetes–(Marigold)
  • Veronica–(Speedwell)

Vines

Botanical Name (Common Name)

  • Campsis–(Trumpet Vine)
  • Clematis–(Clematis)
  • Lonicera–(Honeysuckle)

Trees

Botanical Name (Common Name)

  • Aesculus–(Horsechestnut)
  • Malus–(Apple)
  • Salix–(Willow)

Shrubs

Botanical Name (Common Name)

  • Buddleia–(Butterfly Bush)
  • Caryopteris–(Bluebeard)
  • Chaenomeles–(Flowering Quince)
  • Cornus–(Dogwood)
  • Lonicera–(Honeysuckle)
  • Mahonia–(Mahonia)
  • Philadelphus–(Mockorange)
  • Pontentilla–(Cinquefoil)
  • Ribes–(Currant, Gooseberry)
  • Sambucus–(Elderberry)
  • Spiraea–(Spirea)
  • Syringa–(Lilac)
  • Vaccinium–(Blueberry, Lingonberry)

Now you have an idea of some of the favorite plants for butterflies and hummingbirds. Which of these do you already have planted in your yard or garden? Which ones are you planning to add to your garden or yard?

Photos by Prisonbreak and Bert Glibbery