Gardening Tips I Found in My Grandma’s Cupboard

dscf1441.JPGI told you earlier this week that I would share some treasures that I found in my Grandmother’s cupboard. We are in the process of moving into my grandparent’s home and there is a lot of remodeling to do, both on the inside as well as the outside. It is amazing the things you find while undertaking such a project!

So, what did I find? I found some old gardening tips taped inside her old cupboards. Now, I don’t know whether to necessarily recommend these tips or not, but they are fun to read. I do know that Grandma always had beautiful plants.

Here are the tips I found:

Treatment of gladiolas in spring

Peel and soak bulbs with 2 TB Lysol to 1 Gallon Water. Soak 1 hour to overnight.

In the fall, dig and dry bulbs. Sprinkle generously with Seven Dust. Put in storage (cool). DO NOT FREEZE.

Amaryllis Bulbs

After the blooms have faded, the stalk should be cut off 2 inches above the bulb. But do not disturb the foliage. Keep the pot moist and leaves growing until the Amaryllis can be planted outside.

After all danger of frost in the spring, put the bulb—pot and all—into the ground, buried up to the top edge of the rim of the pot. Remove the dried leaves. Nutrients found in fish emulsion or bone meal are excellent when used at the manufacturer’s recommended amounts. No blooms will occur during late spring and summer, only leaves. This is the time when the flower bud is formed within the bulb.

Around September 1st or just preceding anticipated frosts in your area, lift the pot. Scrape excess planting mix from the top of the pot, and store in a dry, cool (40? to 55? F.) place. DO NOT WATER. Approximately 6 weeks before blooms are desired, remove old leaves and move pot to growing temperatures of 65? to 75? F., and begin to water. Then keep moist at all times. After the Amaryllis blooms, repeat the cycle as before.

Christmas Tree Saver

1 Gallon water

6 TB sugar

6 Aspirin, crushed

Green food coloring

Cut ½ inch from the bottom of tree. Shave bark and cambreum off the depth of water. Keep watered at all times.

If you use any of these, let me know how they worked. I would be interested in knowing how it worked out for you. If you have any other old tried and true gardening tips, leave me a comment below. I’d love to hear about them.

Comments

  1. Brenda–

    I have never tried these, and I haven’t had a reason to, but I always love things that grandparents swear by. My grandmother has some of her own homemade things (not garden related, though) that I think sound crazy, but they work. :)

  2. What a great post. Just the thought of being at Gram’s house and the treasures scattered about…. leaves me feeling nostalgic.

    As for the tips… bleach and lysol? How crazy does that sound. I think I would put that in a concoction to kill something not help it to thrive!

    (I’m an absolute novice, though, when it comes to gardening, I should add.)